Muktagacha and Mymensingh Diary

The old city of Mymensingh by the alluvial banks of the once mighty Brahmaputra still holds the charm of yesteryears. The quintessential ancient buildings and the road running parallel to the river revives the feel of its opulent past. So does, the town of Muktagacha which preserves the palace of the erstwhile zamindars.

Road to Mymensingh
Road to Mymensingh

Muktagacha is a small town within the Mymensingh division of Bangladesh. The ruins of the magnificent Rajbari is being renovated to convert it into a museum. There is a story behind the name of this place. During the early years, this place was known as Binodbari.

The round pillar is an attractive compulsory in most zamindar palaces
The round pillar is an attractive compulsory in most zamindar palaces

When Srikanta Acharya the Zamindar who was the inhabitant of Natore arrived here he was presented a huge lamp stand as a welcome gift by Muktaram Karmakar. The Zamindar was pleased and to recognize the effort of Muktaram he named the place Muktagacha (such lampstand used to be known as ‘gacha’ in those times).

The bightly painted door... I wonder what's behind it?
The brightly painted door… I wonder what’s behind it?

It shows the broad-mindedness and the harmony of the inhabitants of the place. Which may have started during the times of the Zamindar or maybe it was there much before. Thus Muktagacha or Mymensingh as a whole is the place where the residents live in harmony keeping aside their religious, cultural and financial vanity and differences.

Check the lions guarding the locked door
Check the lions guarding the locked door

Speaking to the locals we came to know that this place is the haven for communal peace and harmony. The Hindus participate in the Eid celebration wholeheartedly and the Muslims participate in Durga Puja (the biggest of the Hindu festival in the region) with much enthusiasm.

I liked this part of the building the most
I liked this part of the building the most

To celebrate this joy of coexistence and love between communities we entered the famous Monda shop. (We already had the Monda factor in our mind celebration is just an excuse. 🙂 ) Monda is a renowned sweetmeat of Muktagacha and this shop is the one and only selling these since ages. Having a little chit-chat with the owner we came to know that for many years their family is in this business and they only prepare this single variety of sweet since then till day.

The palace gateway is just near the Monda shop. There were a few houses of commoners within the gateway and then there is the main palace gate. The board by the Department of Archeology (DOA) has placed a brief history and description of the palace near the entrance.

Main entrance of the Muktagacha Rajbari
Main entrance of the Muktagacha Rajbari

It says: “The Muktagacha Palatial Complex is located at Muktagacha Upazila headquarter of Mymensingh District. The Atani palace stands on the west side of the central arched gateway of this palatial complex. This property came under the possession of Srikanta Acharya Chaudhury the founder of the Mymensingh Zamindari in 1727 AD, as a grant from Nawab Alivardi Khan. Then all buildings of this complex were built by different members of the local Zamindar family in several phases of the late 19th to early 20th centuries AD. There are a Durga Temple, Raj-Rajeshwari Temple, Toshakhana, Iron made two storied Hawakhana and many other buildings. There was a revolving stage for cultural performances on the western side of the ‘Nat-Mandap’. Outside the palace there are the Hararameshwar temple and stone made Siva temple that still reflecting the archaeological trends of that period/time. The Department of Archeology (DOA) declared the Atani palace with four other surrounding temples as protected monuments in 1993 AD.”

Information engraved by the DOA
Information engraved by the DOA

The entrance and few buildings have been renovated and are in good shape now. While the rest is in its utter ruins. Restoration and renovation work is in process. Once complete this monument will be converted to a museum.

The ruins of the palace
The ruins of the palace

Even in its ruins, the pure white restored portions of the palace mark its grandness. The architecture of the palace is simple yet elegant. The bright white colour was increasing its aesthetic beauty. We did see the above mentioned ‘iron made two storied Hawakhana’ the ‘Nat-Mandap’. What intrigued me the most was huge pillars and the brightly coloured locked door with the beautiful designs and painted carvings of the tigers above it.

Probably the Hawakhana
Probably the Hawakhana

Peeking through the slit of the dook I could not make out what is inside the dark room. There must be something precious behind the locked and tiger protected doors. Somebody pointed towards the platform within an arched building saying it was the Durga Temple.

This is the Durga Temple
This is the Durga Temple

After loitering within the ruins of this beautiful monument we moved to on to explore the other parts of Mymensingh. Waterbodies are so common in every part of Bangladesh. Large calm and clean ponds, canals, rivers and all other natural waterbodies which I do not know by name are present in every district and every corner.

Large waterbody all around
Large waterbody all around

With the pleasing sights of these vast ponds, we entered the town of Mymensingh. The landscape and the buildings are reminiscent of its rich past. Along with the buildings some large and aged trees seemed to be the witness of the bygone era.

Another pond in Muktagacha
Another pond in Muktagacha

The mighty Brahmaputra which once used to be broad and fearsome, now gently flows weak and lean by its vast silted shores. These banks are now home to many who braves the annual disaster that floods their home every year.

A flock of Duck in the Brahmaputra
A flock of Duck in the Brahmaputra

As we wandered by the banks of the river turned into a canal now, there were many kites flying high in search of prey. There were a few Brahminy Kites and a few Black Kites. While on the bank a flock of duck were actively swimming around.

Black Kite looking for its prey
Black Kite looking for its prey

I had a feeling of peace and contentment in this small town of Mymensingh. On my way back to Dhaka I was thinking how beautifully and cordially the people of different sect and religion are living together as a family.

Brahminy Kite over the Brahmaputra River
Brahminy Kite over the Brahmaputra River

We could have evaded much bloodshed and partition, if we could maintain such strong bond of love and togetherness, ignoring the then divide and rule policy. It would definitely be a better place and a wonderful world.

Ballons with a message after a social function
Ballons with a message after a social function

Muktagacha and Mymensingh at a glance, with travel information.

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9 thoughts on “Muktagacha and Mymensingh Diary

  1. Hello Sarmistha: this is a lovely post. Admire the stunning pictures and the description. My favorite: ‘check the lions guarding the locked door’ picture. it’s a majestic door and indeed intriguing what’s behind it.

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  2. The design around the arches is so intricate! The bright red door and the gorgeous white carvings are stunning (the architect had probably predicted instagram!)

    Will you please share your Bangladesh itinerary with me? I am Bangal and my fiance ghoti and I really do want to visit the country of my ancestors and he keeps saying its too unsafe, etc. Did you have a good time? What was the best part?

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    1. Thanks for stopping by. Haha! Well said about the architect’s prediction 😀

      Visiting Bangladesh is absolutely safe. You just need to visit when there is no news of any disturbance. Dhaka is the soul of the nation. You need to visit Dhaka first and all other districts are connected to it. Basically, you need to plan it in such a way that you return back to Dhaka and then again travel to the other districts except for a few that are interconnected. The map will help you in figuring out as the main highway connects to almost every places. We visited Dhaka, Dhaka to Barisal and back, Dhaka to Cox Bazar and back via Chittagong, Dhaka to Mymensingh and back.

      The people are warm and welcoming and overall the same language gives you the extra feeling of warmth. 🙂 You can go ahead with your plans to visit Bangladesh. Definitely, you will enjoy your trip. Waiting to read you Bangladesh stories.

      Like

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